Google+ Chase Alias' Show : June 2011

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

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Chase Alias' Show

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Lytro: The $50M Tech That May Change Photography Forever
BY Kit EatonToday
The startup's capital comes from big names like Andreessen Horowitz and Greylock, and its tech team includes a co-founder of Silicon Graphics and the man who was the chief architect for Palm's revolutionary webOS software. So what's the fuss all about?

lytro

That click you just heard? That was the sound of photography as we know it changing.

http://images.fastcompany.com/upload/lytro.jpg

Lytro is a Silicon Valley startup that's building on research carried out by CEO Ren Ng at Stanford, and its promise is simple: With its light field camera hardware and software, it could change photography in an almost unimaginable number of ways--starting with the thing that most news sites have picked up on this morning, the lack of a need to focus a photo.

Meanwhile, Lytro's $50 million in start-up capital has come from big names like Andreessen Horowitz and Greylock, and its technological team includes a co-founder of Silicon Graphics and the man who was the chief architect for Palm's revolutionary webOS software. So what's the fuss all about?

It's called light field, or plenoptic, photography, and the core thinking behind Lytro is contained neatly in one paper from the original Stanford research--though the basic principle is simple. Normal cameras work in roughly the same way your eye does, with a lens at the front that gathers rays of light from the view in front of it, and focusses them through an aperture onto a sensor (the silicon in your DSLR or the retina in your eye). To focus your eye or a traditional camera you adjust the lens in different ways to capture light rays from different parts of the scene and throw it onto the sensor. Easy. This does have a number of side-effects including the need to focus on one thing. This adds complexity, and, if used well, beauty to a photo.

But Lytro's technology includes a large array of microlenses in front of the camera sensor. Think of them as a synthetic equivalent of the thousands of tiny lenses on a fly's eye. The physics and math gets a bit tricky here, but the overall result is this: Instead of the camera's sensor recording a single image that's shaped by the settings of your camera lens, aperture and so on, the sensor records a complex pattern that represents light coming from all the parts of the scene in front of it, not just the bits you would've focussed on using a normal camera. The image is then passed to software which can decode it.

And this is where things get freaky. Because the system captures data about the direction of light rays from the scene, it can be programmed to "focus" on any depth in the photo--years after you took the original image. In an instant images can be more ideal, cameras could do away with bulky, power-hungry and expensive focusing systems, photos can be snapped much more quickly and the average Joe Public doesn't need to worry about focusing an image. The lenses also capture light in low lighting conditions that would previously have needed a flash. That's a big enough impact, and it could have enormous repercussions for the whole camera industry.

But that's not all. Because the image is finalized in a computer, you can process it in a number of ways--including stacking together images focused on different things into an animation that could reveal much more detail of the original scene. Imagine a war photo where you can focus all the way from the nearby friendly fighters, down the barrels of their guns, over the barricade and into the eyes of the enemies down the street. Imagine internet adverts that dynamically move through the detail of a dress in a fashion shoot. Imagine Harry Potter-esque front page images on your tablet PC-edition newspaper.

And there're other implications: There's no reason you couldn't stack two plenoptic cameras side-by-side and generate some truly brain-tricking variations on 3-D imaging. And theoretically you could generate video using the lenses (although the computing burden might end up being very significant) and that could open the door to movie special effects that may make the Matrix look like a Victorian magic lantern show.

That's why there's all this excitement about Lytro. And the excitement persists even though the company is taking the unusual step of launching its own cameras later in the year, rather than licensing adoption by other more established billion-dollar photography names like Canon and Nikon.

But plenoptic imaging isn't something you can trademark, necessarily, and it's likely that in the same way James Dyson's revolutionary vaccum cleaners forced changes on long-established designs across that market, Lytro's system will push other makers to develop their own similar tech. Indeed it's pretty likely, given that Ng's 2005 paper notes it's "a simple optical modification to existing digital cameras that causes the photosensor to sample the in-camera light field. This modification is achieved without altering the external operation of the camera."



And yet: Lytro may still have changed photos forever.

[Image: Research paper, Stanford 2005]

Chat about this news with Kit Eaton on Twitter and Fast Company too.
ReTweet Critique: @dastodd Charles Dastodd retweet by Chase Alias, R... http://ping.fm/WEDDD

@dastodd Charles Dastodd retweet by Chase Alias, ReTweet Critique

@dastodd Charles Dastodd retweet by Chase Alias, ReTweet Critique



@dastodd Charles Dastodd

Beautiful Landscape #Photography by @thefella - "Veszprém Sunset" http://flic.kr/p/9VJNP8


ReTweet Critique: @dastodd Charles Dastodd retweet by Chase Alias, R...

ReTweet Critique: @dastodd Charles Dastodd retweet by Chase Alias, R...: "@dastodd Charles Dastodd Beautiful Landscape # Photography by @ thefella - 'Veszprém Sunset' http://flic.kr/p/9VJ..."

Xaomena review retweet by @ChaseAlias

ReTweet of @19Sixty3

I love this photographer on Flickr - Check out Xaomena http://t.co/fkpSYM1



- Critique by Holden Vance III for http://inflickr.bligspot.com using BlogPress from my iPod

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

InFlickr: TishyBaby as Reviewed by Chase Alias, Retweet Critique for InFlickr http://ping.fm/0atx4
InFlickr: TishyBaby as Reviewed by Chase Alias, Retweet Critique for InFlickr http://ping.fm/OALcJ
ReTweet Critique: Pedro Vélez on the problem with Chicago - artnet M... http://ping.fm/Y43gS
ReTweet Critique http://ping.fm/GHCIC

ReTweet Critique

The Charlie Sheen Complex
CHICAGO, WE HAVE A PROBLEM
by Pedro Vélez

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On the heels of what probably was the saddest edition ever of Art Chicago (and those other fairs that went along with it), the art fair's former vice president, Tony Karman, announced plans for another art bazaar, this one titled exposition CHICAGO and due to launch in 2012. Karman’s chutzpah is to be admired, considering his losing record in bringing sexy back to the tired Art Chicago brand during his tenure there.

From: http://ping.fm/JoTHU

The Charlie Sheen Complex CHICAGO, WE HAVE A PROBLEM

The Charlie Sheen Complex

CHICAGO, WE HAVE A PROBLEM

by Pedro Vélez



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On the heels of what probably was the saddest edition ever of Art Chicago (and those other fairs that went along with it), the art fair's former vice president, Tony Karman, announced plans for another art bazaar, this one titled exposition CHICAGO and due to launch in 2012. Karman’s chutzpah is to be admired, considering his losing record in bringing sexy back to the tired Art Chicago brand during his tenure there.


ReTweet Critique: Pedro Vélez on the problem with Chicago - artnet M...


ReTweet Critique: Pedro Vélez on the problem with Chicago - artnet M...: "Pedro Vélez on the problem with Chicago - artnet Magazine The Charlie Sheen Complex CHICAGO, WE HAVE A PROBLEM by Pedro Vélez ..."

The Charlie Sheen Complex

CHICAGO, WE HAVE A PROBLEM
by Pedro Vélez
Share |

On the heels of what probably was the saddest edition ever of Art Chicago (and those other fairs that went along with it), the art fair's former vice president, Tony Karman, announced plans for another art bazaar, this one titled exposition CHICAGO and due to launch in 2012. Karman’s chutzpah is to be admired, considering his losing record in bringing sexy back to the tired Art Chicago brand during his tenure there.

Monday, June 20, 2011

Evil Daddies of Fairfield County: Episode #1, Married in Fairfield, Coming Fall 2011

Evil Daddies of Fairfield County: Episode #1, Married in Fairfield, Coming Fall 2011



Staring Chase Alias as Dr. Larry Flick



Only on Chase Alias' Show

http://www.chasealias.com


Evil Daddies of Fairfield County: Episode #1, Married in Fairfield, Coming Fall 2011 http://ping.fm/uXlQp
Chase Alias' Show http://ping.fm/JMpNl

Evil Daddies of Fairfield County: Episode #1, Married in Fairfield, Coming Fall 2011

Evil Daddies of Fairfield County: Episode #1, Married in Fairfield, Coming Fall 2011

Staring Chase Alias as Dr. Larry Flick

Only on Chase Alias' Show
http://www.chasealias.com



Arrested Development by Jessica Rita for ReTweet Critique

Arrested Development by Jessica Rita for ReTweet Critique
Responding to Pop Culture

Arrested Development
by Jessica Rita for ReTweet Critique


The pop culture world we live in today consists of things I would be more then ashamed to name. As far as the television realm is concerned, the way we judge whether or not a TV show is worth our time is all based on ratings. The count of viewers watching these television shows can make it or break it and honestly, sometimes the credibility of the general public can be questionable. With TV shows like “The Jersey Shore” or “The Secret Life of the American Teenager” being mass-produced at a high rate, it’s hard to find those unique gems that I like to call quality television. With that being said, it was an incredible relief when “Arrested Development” arrived on the network television scene and an even more incredible disappointment when cut short.


I started watching “Arrested Development” when it’s second season was on the air. I’ll be the first to admit, I wasn’t a fan. If the viewer doesn’t start from the absolute beginning, the storyline won’t make much sense; here in lies a weakness, and in my opinion, the reason for it’s demise. “Arrested Development” was a half hour show that didn’t really fit the “sitcom” genre because each episode wouldn’t be able to stand on its own. This can cause a slow gain in viewers by scaring them off when they don’t understand the quick inside jokes and episode callbacks. I consider this a sort of a double standard because “Arrested Development” is a superlative TV show that rewards its audience for actually watching it from the pilot.


The Bluth Family was an extremely dysfunctional family with slightly detrimental character dynamics. The collection of totally random elements and sub plots provides a wacky environment that not a lot of people can relate to. The target audience was one that can understand intelligent humor that involved current events and politics. At the time “Arrested Development was on the air, the mockumentary style it had perfected and the brilliant writing were extremely underrated; however, in the days of the internet, “Arrested Development” has acquired a huge following. Now that the show is available to watch online for free, whether it be pirating or streaming, more and more of the intelligent viewer are watching. I personally put this TV show on a pedestal and today’s finer sitcoms can thank “Arrested Development” for helping set up a much more distinguished structure.
ReTweet Critique: Arrested Development by Jessica Rita for ReTweet Critique http://ping.fm/bVIZK

Arrested Development by Jessica Rita for ReTweet Critique

Responding to Pop Culture



Arrested Development

by Jessica Rita for ReTweet Critique





The pop culture world we live in today consists of things I would be more then ashamed to name. As far as the television realm is concerned, the way we judge whether or not a TV show is worth our time is all based on ratings. The count of viewers watching these television shows can make it or break it and honestly, sometimes the credibility of the general public can be questionable. With TV shows like “The Jersey Shore” or “The Secret Life of the American Teenager” being mass-produced at a high rate, it’s hard to find those unique gems that I like to call quality television. With that being said, it was an incredible relief when “Arrested Development” arrived on the network television scene and an even more incredible disappointment when cut short.





I started watching “Arrested Development” when it’s second season was on the air. I’ll be the first to admit, I wasn’t a fan. If the viewer doesn’t start from the absolute beginning, the storyline won’t make much sense; here in lies a weakness, and in my opinion, the reason for it’s demise. “Arrested Development” was a half hour show that didn’t really fit the “sitcom” genre because each episode wouldn’t be able to stand on its own. This can cause a slow gain in viewers by scaring them off when they don’t understand the quick inside jokes and episode callbacks. I consider this a sort of a double standard because “Arrested Development” is a superlative TV show that rewards its audience for actually watching it from the pilot.





The Bluth Family was an extremely dysfunctional family with slightly detrimental character dynamics. The collection of totally random elements and sub plots provides a wacky environment that not a lot of people can relate to. The target audience was one that can understand intelligent humor that involved current events and politics. At the time “Arrested Development was on the air, the mockumentary style it had perfected and the brilliant writing were extremely underrated; however, in the days of the internet, “Arrested Development” has acquired a huge following. Now that the show is available to watch online for free, whether it be pirating or streaming, more and more of the intelligent viewer are watching. I personally put this TV show on a pedestal and today’s finer sitcoms can thank “Arrested Development” for helping set up a much more distinguished structure.


Arrested Development by Jessica Rita for ReTweet Critique

Responding to Pop Culture



Arrested Development

by Jessica Rita for ReTweet Critique





The pop culture world we live in today consists of things I would be more then ashamed to name. As far as the television realm is concerned, the way we judge whether or not a TV show is worth our time is all based on ratings. The count of viewers watching these television shows can make it or break it and honestly, sometimes the credibility of the general public can be questionable. With TV shows like “The Jersey Shore” or “The Secret Life of the American Teenager” being mass-produced at a high rate, it’s hard to find those unique gems that I like to call quality television. With that being said, it was an incredible relief when “Arrested Development” arrived on the network television scene and an even more incredible disappointment when cut short.





I started watching “Arrested Development” when it’s second season was on the air. I’ll be the first to admit, I wasn’t a fan. If the viewer doesn’t start from the absolute beginning, the storyline won’t make much sense; here in lies a weakness, and in my opinion, the reason for it’s demise. “Arrested Development” was a half hour show that didn’t really fit the “sitcom” genre because each episode wouldn’t be able to stand on its own. This can cause a slow gain in viewers by scaring them off when they don’t understand the quick inside jokes and episode callbacks. I consider this a sort of a double standard because “Arrested Development” is a superlative TV show that rewards its audience for actually watching it from the pilot.





The Bluth Family was an extremely dysfunctional family with slightly detrimental character dynamics. The collection of totally random elements and sub plots provides a wacky environment that not a lot of people can relate to. The target audience was one that can understand intelligent humor that involved current events and politics. At the time “Arrested Development was on the air, the mockumentary style it had perfected and the brilliant writing were extremely underrated; however, in the days of the internet, “Arrested Development” has acquired a huge following. Now that the show is available to watch online for free, whether it be pirating or streaming, more and more of the intelligent viewer are watching. I personally put this TV show on a pedestal and today’s finer sitcoms can thank “Arrested Development” for helping set up a much more distinguished structure.


ReTweet Critique: Retweet of @dastodd by Chase Alias, ReTweet Critique http://ping.fm/v3TpB
ReTweet Critique: InFlickr: TishyBaby as Reviewed by Chase Alias, Retweet Critique for InFlickr http://ping.fm/Is9mH

TishyBaby as Reviewed by Chase Alias, Retweet Critique for InFlickr

TishyBaby as Reviewed by Chase Alias, Retweet Critique for InFlickr

TishyBaby as Reviewed by Chase Alias, Retweet Critique for InFlickr.



TishyBaby has been on my contact list since I first began using Flickr. I've had the privilege of seeing her work progress and grow. A number of her new portraits hav a wonderful old fashioned look and a great glow. The classical compositions mixed with very contemporary aesthetic make her works a joy to look at. TishyBaby definitely has my vote for "In"Flickr.


InFlickr: TishyBaby as Reviewed by Chase Alias, Retweet Critique for InFlickr http://ping.fm/e4Ig8

Saturday, June 18, 2011

ReTweet CritiqueTimeslide

What are These Birds, and Why are They So Angry? By Chase Alias, ReTweet Critique
What are These Birds, and Why are They So Angry? Why does a video game become popular? What do you need to have in the game to make people want to play it? I think you need simple controls, great graphic, a creative backstory and cute sounds. Angry Birds is a game that has all of this.
Jun 18

Evil Daddies of Fairfield County with Chase Alias as Dr. Larry Flick
Evil Daddies of Fairfield County with Chase Alias as Dr.
May 18
CamUSall Mag - Concept of Self Portraits: CamUSall Mag - June Topic, "Concept of Self Portra...
CamUSall Mag - Concept of Self Portraits: CamUSall Mag - June Topic, "Concept of Self Portra...: "CamUSall Mag - June Topic, 'Concept of Self Portraits' Submit your concepts via your Flickr http:// address to: chasealias@gmail.com Subm..."
May 2
Free Ai Weiwei
Free Ai Weiwei, a photo by Taymaz Valley on Flickr.
Conceptual Realtor: Evil Daddies of Fairfield County with Holden Vance...
Conceptual Realtor: Evil Daddies of Fairfield County with Holden Vance...: "Evil Daddies of Fairfield County with Holden Vance III as The Conceptual Realtor, Danny DuFrain , a photo by Chase Alias on Flickr."
dastodd RT by Chase Alias for ReTweet Critique
dastodd: Rush Hour RT: My Daily #Photo - "Creating the Future" #Nikon #Oxford http://flic.kr/p/9GfrMe- ReTweet Critique uses BlogPress for iPhone.
@mfaphotovideo MFA Photo RT by Chase Alias, Retweet Critique
Department Chair Charles Traub is featured in this month's issue of The Brooklyn Rail with a cover image and...http://fb.me/Wz9C2Ijs Charles Traub, “Paris, KY, 1968.” Copyright Charles H.
Love the Future: Igor Pikazen
Love the Future: Igor Pikazen: "Great musical future"
Dark City - 6
Dark City - 6, a photo by Omri Suissa on Flickr.Had to play this back again.
Chase Alias on Cristiano aka Brilliantdandy's Photostream
Chase Alias on Cristiano aka Brilliantdandy's Photostream There is some awesome self portrait. Here.
Artforum RT for Retweet Critique
Picks: Alexis Harding. 04.07.11-05.21.11 Rubicon Gallery, Dublin, review written by Gemma Tipton http://bit.ly/ksJ7hO- ReTweet Critique uses BlogPress for iPhone.
Evil Daddies of Fairfield County with Chase Alias as Dr. Larry Flick, Realizing #2
InFlickr: Bug-Chaser, series "Chase Alias' Chase Alias, ReTweet Critique for "In"Flickr
RT: Dastodd by Chase Alias, ReTweet Critique
Chase Alias' Show: magnolius: Bird rib by Maurizio Bongiovanni oil on canvas
Kurt Vonnegut Turns Cinderella Into An Equation RT by Chase Alias
Evil Daddies of Fairfield County with Holden Vance III as The Conceptual Realtor, Danny DuFrain
dastodd RT by Chase Alias
ArtKnowledge RT by Holden Vance III for ReTweet Critique
Thomas Marzano (@ThomasMarzano) RT by Chase Alias for ReTweet Critique
Hirshhorn RT by Chase Alias for Retweet Critique
dastodd RT by Chase Alias for ReTweet Critique
Chase Alias using changes from Chinese cyber attack as protest
TheWhitechapel RT by ReTweet Critique
artinfodotcom RT by ReTweet Critique
What we Found on Craigslist.
dastodd RT by ReTweet Critique
Dastodd RT for InFlickr
CamUSall Mag June Topic
InFlickr: dastodd RT for ReTweet Critique
dastodd RT for ReTweet Critique
dastodd: Danbo Caught in the Act! by @PhotogLA
ArtKnowledge
RT @DerekGriggs, May 1, 2011 9:45am
Camusall Blog - Concept of Self Portraits: Holden Vance III critique of A. Klioutchnikov (thedot_ru's) Self Portrait, May 1, 2011 8:56am
What are These Birds, and Why are They So Angry? By Chase Alias, ReTweet Critique
Posted 12 minutes ago by Chase Alias
What are These Birds, and Why are They So Angry?

Why does a video game become popular? What do you need to have in the game to make people want to play it? I think you need simple controls, great graphic, a creative backstory and cute sounds. Angry Birds is a game that has all of this. The backstory is creative yet simple. The story is that a bunch of hungry pigs stole the eggs from the birds. The Angry Birds are forced to set off on an adventure to rescue their eggs in order to ensure their survival. The control is simple because in each level you need to fling the birds from a fixed slingshot.

The sound effects are fantastic the pigs oink and sniffle seeming to goad the Angry Birds and when they are hit by a bird or falling debris from their elaborate constructs they squeal then explode with a little pop. And of course as they explode the 5000 points that you’ve just earned rises from the smoke of the explosion. The bird noises are equally cute and seem to make the game super addictive. The birds squawk and tweet constantly ant as you fling them from the slingshot they seem to yell something that sounds like a raspy crackeeeeers.

The graphics on the version I play, Google Chrome Beta Edition, are stunning and very reminiscent of the old Nintendo Super Mario Brothers games many of us used to play as kids. This is what I believe has made this game an instant classic, the fact that it’s so easy to visually relate to the graphics. It brings you back to your childhood. The other great thing is that in many versions the game is free and even in IOS its very cheep. The only pitfalls with the game are some technical glitches with the Beta versions, which I’m sure, will be worked out. Also there is no music playing during the game on some versions.

All said and done Angry Birds has become a part of the cultural lexicon. This fact can be seen by the way the game is being used by Google to advertise it’s new Nexus phone. So I guess the idea the creators had by making the game free or cheep paid off in the end with the major Google advertising contract. I only hope that one day I can create my own Angry Birds.

David Pollack aka Chase Alias, ReTweet Critique
Review of the video game “Angry Birds”

ReTweet Critique http://ping.fm/gcLJ5

What are These Birds, and Why are They So Angry?

What are These Birds, and Why are They So Angry?



Why does a video game become popular? What do you need to have in the game to make people want to play it? I think you need simple controls, great graphic, a creative backstory and cute sounds. Angry Birds is a game that has all of this. The backstory is creative yet simple. The story is that a bunch of hungry pigs stole the eggs from the birds. The Angry Birds are forced to set off on an adventure to rescue their eggs in order to ensure their survival. The control is simple because in each level you need to fling the birds from a fixed slingshot.



The sound effects are fantastic the pigs oink and sniffle seeming to goad the Angry Birds and when they are hit by a bird or falling debris from their elaborate constructs they squeal then explode with a little pop. And of course as they explode the 5000 points that you’ve just earned rises from the smoke of the explosion. The bird noises are equally cute and seem to make the game super addictive. The birds squawk and tweet constantly ant as you fling them from the slingshot they seem to yell something that sounds like a raspy crackeeeeers.



The graphics on the version I play, Google Chrome Beta Edition, are stunning and very reminiscent of the old Nintendo Super Mario Brothers games many of us used to play as kids. This is what I believe has made this game an instant classic, the fact that it’s so easy to visually relate to the graphics. It brings you back to your childhood. The other great thing is that in many versions the game is free and even in IOS its very cheep. The only pitfalls with the game are some technical glitches with the Beta versions, which I’m sure, will be worked out. Also there is no music playing during the game on some versions.



All said and done Angry Birds has become a part of the cultural lexicon. This fact can be seen by the way the game is being used by Google to advertise it’s new Nexus phone. So I guess the idea the creators had by making the game free or cheep paid off in the end with the major Google advertising contract. I only hope that one day I can create my own Angry Birds.



David Pollack aka Chase Alias, ReTweet Critique

Review of the video game “Angry Birds”


Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Free AI WEIWEI

Free AI WEIWEI by Sicco2007
Free AI WEIWEI, a photo by Sicco2007 on Flickr.

Free Ai Weiwei

Free Ai Weiwei by catheadsix
Free Ai Weiwei, a photo by catheadsix on Flickr.

Free Ai Weiwei

Free Ai Weiwei by Taymaz Valley
Free Ai Weiwei, a photo by Taymaz Valley on Flickr.

Evil Daddies of Fairfield County with Holden Vance III as The Conceptual Realtor, Danny DuFrain, a photo by Chase Alias on Flickr. http://amplify.com/u/a153t2
ReTweet Critique: Conceptual Realtor: Evil Daddies of Fairfield County with Holden Vance... http://ping.fm/vmKsl

Evil Daddies of Fairfield County with Chase Alias as Dr. Larry Flick, Realizing #2

Thursday, June 2, 2011

ReTweet Critique: InFlickr: Bug-Chaser, series http://ping.fm/Crfzl

Bug-Chaser, series "Chase Alias' Chase Alias, ReTweet Critique for "In"Flickr

Bug-Chaser, series "Chase Alias' Chase Alias, ReTweet Critique for "In"Flickr

This is a stunning Conceptual Art piece and a great social commentary and has my vote for "In"Flickr.






Chase Alias, ReTweet Critique for "In"Flickr

Bug-Chaser, series "Chase Alias' Craigslist, 2011" | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

ReTweet Critique: InFlickr: Bug-Chaser, series "Chase Alias' Chase Alias, ReTweet Critique for "In"Flickr

InFlickr: Bug-Chaser, series "Chase Alias' Chase Alias, ReTweet Critique for "In"Flickr

Bug-Chaser, series "Chase Alias' Chase Alias, ReTweet Critique for "In"Flickr

This is a stunning Conceptual Art piece and a great social commentary and has my vote for "In"Flickr.

Chase Alias, ReTweet Critique for "In"FlickrReTweet Critique: InFlickr: Bug-Chaser, series "Chase Alias' Chase Alias, ReTweet Critique for "In"Flickr

Chase Alias, ReTweet Critique for "In"Flickr

his is a stunning Conceptual Art piece and a great social commentary and has my vote for "In"Flickr.


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