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Monday, June 20, 2011

Arrested Development by Jessica Rita for ReTweet Critique

Arrested Development by Jessica Rita for ReTweet Critique
Responding to Pop Culture

Arrested Development
by Jessica Rita for ReTweet Critique


The pop culture world we live in today consists of things I would be more then ashamed to name. As far as the television realm is concerned, the way we judge whether or not a TV show is worth our time is all based on ratings. The count of viewers watching these television shows can make it or break it and honestly, sometimes the credibility of the general public can be questionable. With TV shows like “The Jersey Shore” or “The Secret Life of the American Teenager” being mass-produced at a high rate, it’s hard to find those unique gems that I like to call quality television. With that being said, it was an incredible relief when “Arrested Development” arrived on the network television scene and an even more incredible disappointment when cut short.


I started watching “Arrested Development” when it’s second season was on the air. I’ll be the first to admit, I wasn’t a fan. If the viewer doesn’t start from the absolute beginning, the storyline won’t make much sense; here in lies a weakness, and in my opinion, the reason for it’s demise. “Arrested Development” was a half hour show that didn’t really fit the “sitcom” genre because each episode wouldn’t be able to stand on its own. This can cause a slow gain in viewers by scaring them off when they don’t understand the quick inside jokes and episode callbacks. I consider this a sort of a double standard because “Arrested Development” is a superlative TV show that rewards its audience for actually watching it from the pilot.


The Bluth Family was an extremely dysfunctional family with slightly detrimental character dynamics. The collection of totally random elements and sub plots provides a wacky environment that not a lot of people can relate to. The target audience was one that can understand intelligent humor that involved current events and politics. At the time “Arrested Development was on the air, the mockumentary style it had perfected and the brilliant writing were extremely underrated; however, in the days of the internet, “Arrested Development” has acquired a huge following. Now that the show is available to watch online for free, whether it be pirating or streaming, more and more of the intelligent viewer are watching. I personally put this TV show on a pedestal and today’s finer sitcoms can thank “Arrested Development” for helping set up a much more distinguished structure.
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